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FIGFest

STRFKR, De Lux, Daniel T music

June 28, 2019


6:00 PM - 11:00 PM

FIGat7th
735 S. Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90017

Downtown LA’s free annual summer music festival FIGFest—an important stop on the launch pad of top artists including The Internet and Anderson .Paak—returns to FIGat7th to energize the city this June with fun summer nights and eclectic sounds. In partnership with Spaceland Presents, LA’s leading concert promotion firm, the festival kicks off June 7 and runs four consecutive Friday nights at Downtown LA’s premier shopping destination, FIGat7th.

The plaza at FIGat7th will be transformed into DTLA’s outdoor stage brought to life with performances by leading R&B, hip-hop, pop, soul, dance, and electronic artists. Kicking off the series is LA’s very own explosive and honest rock act Cherry Glazerr (June 7), followed by the inspired and infectious hip-hop soul of rapper and live band Oddisee & Good Compny (June 14), then the sensual fusion of funk, pop, Latin, and electronic sounds by experimental duo Buscabulla (June 21) and concluding with the energetic and playful, synth- infused, indie-electronic-rock of STRFKR (June 28).

Each Friday, the bar opens and a DJ kicks off the night at 6:00pm, followed by a 7:00pm opener, 8:00pm DJ set, 8:30pm headliner, and wrapping the night with a 10:00pm DJ set. Make sure to grab dinner, drinks and snacks before the show at TASTE Food Hall on FIGat7th’s lower level.

FIGFest’s unique lineup reflects the vibrant cultural center that Downtown LA has become. Past festivals have featured The Internet, Superhumanoids, Soulection, Wavves, Tuxedo, Hanni El Khatib, Poolside, and Anderson .Paak. FIGFest is one of the only free concert experiences open to the public in Los Angeles where music lovers can dine, drink, and shop all in one spot.

ABOUT STRFKR

Being No One, Going Nowhere. The title of STRFKR’s fourth album may seem bleak at first. But hold it in your head a minute, feel its weight, and you may recognize the phrase for what it is: a goal. In the era of the personal brand — amid the FOMO Age — it’s increasingly hard to shed a stifling sense of self, or to just be in the moment that you’re in. Well, consider this an invitation to get blissfully insignificant. That’s what STRFKR founder Joshua Hodges aimed to do when he exiled himself to the desert to create this record, but he returned with his most significant work yet: a set of darkly glistening dance songs rife with sticky beats, earworming hooks, philosophical heft, and bittersweet beauty.

The album opens on “Tape Machine,” and the difference is readily apparent. On 2013’s Miracle Mile, STRFKR refined a full-band sound, but this doubles down on and completely reimagines the project’s electronic and pop roots. The initial synths could fuel a rave, and the ensuing groove could score a Drive sequel, but the song is richer still, with cosmic effects flying overhead and a psych-folk earthiness below. It isn’t that the band sat this LP out — drummer (etc.) Keil Corcoran penned the thick astral disco of “In the End,” and he and bassist (etc.) Shawn Glassford both pitch in throughout. But Being No One, Going Nowhere was born in Joshua Tree after Hodges packed up his Los Angeles apartment and moved to that tiny Mojave outpost under the great big sky. “It came together for me in the desert,” he says. “Out there, it’s easy to feel small and slow.”

When Hodges started STRFKR in 2007, it was designed to be success-proof. The name was both unfit for radio and a jab at fame-chasers. But the project was also meant to be bright, playful and brimming with energy. He stumbled upon a winning juxtaposition that’s a STRFKR staple to this day: dark (or heavy) lyrics set to happy music. Hodges credits that to Elliott Smith’s influence, although Being No One, Going Nowhere has closer sonic kin in Italo-disco, kosmische musik and Tony Hoffer’s work with Phoenix, Beck and M83. English thinker/writer Alan Watts, a scholar of Eastern philosophy, was another muse for Hodges — his voice appears on nearly every STRFKR release, including this one. That’s him on “interspace,” talking about sloughing off preconceived identity to find one’s place in the universe, which is the story of Hodges’ eventual career: stop trying — no, start not trying — and succeed.

This album’s name actually paraphrases the title of a book by Ayya Khema, a Buddhist nun, but the concept came to Hodges in a less chaste setting. “I had an experience at a BDSM club that was really freeing,” he says. “I realized that the appeal is letting go of your mind and stress. You can be super present with the pain, and then the pain isn’t even pain. It’s a gateway to freedom.” In a way, each song on Being No One, Going Nowhere seeks that end. There’s the reality-refracting fantasy of “Never Ever,” the hard truths about addiction’s ravages on “Tape Machine,” a death-defying coming of age tale on “Open Your Eyes,” and references to Hermann Hesse’s 1919 novel of self-realization, Demian, on “When I’m With You.” If the words don’t set you free, the music — exuberant, enveloping, incredibly catchy — should do so handily.

None of which is to imply that STRFKR is drifting along aimlessly. To the contrary, Hodges crafted this album’s dance bent with the stage in mind. The live setup these days includes a custom-made LED wall and a homemade light show that syncs with the rhythm of the songs (also, the occasional crowd-surfing astronaut and band-in-drag). Plus, he camped out at the house of producer Jeffrey Brodsky (Yacht, RAC) for a week and a half, working all hours to ensure Being No One, Going Nowhere sounds as crisply booming over PAs as it does in headphones. Even if Hodges is too busy pushing the future of indie dance-pop forward to possibly attain his goal of unplugging, his aspiration is everything: “Existing is it. This moment is enough.”

ABOUT DE LUX

After establishing a sound on their debut Voyage and establishing an identity with the revelatory Generation, L.A. disco-not-disco duo De Lux took a moment to re-center and come back leaner, sharper, clearer and deeper on their new More Disco Songs About Love. Now that co-founders Sean Guerin and Isaac Franco know how to play and what to say, they’re ready to just get lost in the music. As the band puts it: “We like to say Voyage was our baby, Generation was our baby all grown up and More Disco Songs About Lovethinks growing up sucks and just wants to party smart.

Their 2014 debut Voyage revealed De Lux as an outfit matching post-punk sentiment and the-sociopolitical-is-personal perspective to joyfully indulgent analog synthesizer soundscapes and a deliriously transportive musical joy. 2015’s Generation added an almost-documentary aspect to their dance music, delivering clearly personal stories of anxiety and aspiration. And 2015 also saw their first major festival appearance at Bonnaroo, the prelude to their hotly tipped Coachella debut in 2016 and then sharing a bill with Arcade Fire at New York City’s Panorama fest.

Now More Disco Songs is a stream-of-consciousness tour through De Lux’s reality. (With New York City dance-punk legend Sal P. of Liquid Liquid and the Pop Group’s maniacal Mark Stewart as guests, of course.) Though the title might seem like some kind of clever reference, it’s really simple and direct. The disco is the sound—in the most innovative way, of course—and the love is the sentiment: “It’s all literal to us but we realize that it might not be for others,” they say. “We like the idea of giving listeners something to question. But there’s love in there.”

ABOUT DANIEL T:

Daniel T. is a Los Angeles-based DJ and producer. A longtime record collector and digger, Daniel has become a local authority on bygone music. He hosts regular radio shows on Dublab (Crosseyed & Painless) and NTS (Heat-Wave) while also throwing a weekly party for Heat-Wave in collaboration with Wyatt Potts at former Hollywood stripclub, Gold Diggers. Daniel started making music a decade ago as one half of Cosmic Kids. Alongside Ron Poznansky, he made a name for himself producing heady house and astral dance tunes, and releasing originals and remixes with cult labels Throne of Blood, Let’s Play House and DFA.

RUN OF SHOW:

6:00 pm            Beer Garden Opens & DJ Set 

7:00 pm            Opener 

8:00 pm            DJ Set 

8:30 pm            Headliner 

10:00 pm          DJ Set & Closing Remarks